Get Your Free Quote Today 850.250.3756

Fall Landscaping DIY Checklist

Fall Landscaping DIY Checklist

Fall means cooler weather, changing leaves, and a number of other seasonal changes that all affect your landscaping, as autumn approaches, make sure your property is prepared by making a list…and checking it twice. It’ll ensure that your yard stays beautiful from this season on into the next.

  • Keep It Clear: Growth above ground slows, but the roots of your plants, shrubs, trees, and grass are all still developing; and fall provides those roots with moist soil conditions that help strengthen them for the months ahead. It’s important to keep the ground clear of debris like fallen leaves so that growth isn’t inhibited—all that build-up can become a barrier between moisture and sunlight reaching the root system and eventually endanger your plants.
  • Mow: Mowing the lawn down to a height of 1 1/4 inches, which is short enough to fend off diseases and won’t become a catching point for leaves and other debris that may blow across your grass. Be careful about mowing too low, however; not leaving enough of the upper blade where food is made will endanger the grass.
  • Rake: Rake up fallen leaves from the yard, and if you’re interested in making your own fertilizer, put them in a compost bin or designate a small area of your property specifically as a compost pile. As the pile breaks down, it becomes an ideal source of nutrients for landscaping; so to encourage faster decomposition, rake the pile or flip the bin weekly.
  • Aerate: Soil can become compressed by rainfall and make it difficult for water and nutrients to reach the roots of your grass, but aerating allows those essential elements to flow on through.
  • Fertilize: Fall temps are perfect for fertilizers to be at their most effective, just before winter, when having a strong root system becomes most essential. By fertilizing in fall, you’re supplying them with nutrients that will keep them healthy; conversely, fertilizing in late summer usually causes them to send those nutrients to their leaves rather than their roots, which won’t be of much help when the temperature drops.
  • Plant: Plant new shrubs in fall, when the soil is soft, cool, and moist—all of which encourage new plantings to establish their roots.
  • Trim: Dead branches become safety hazards in winter, when snow and wind can make them break off, endangering your home as well as anyone who may be on your property. Simple trimming will remove the potential danger; but for larger jobs, you may need to hire a landscaping maintenance company.
  • Make the Cut: Take a look at your garden and decide what needs to go. Remove annuals that have seen better days, and cut the stems of your perennials down to just above ground level. They’ll grow back in spring; but during winter, all their energy will be concentrated on strengthening their roots.
  • Mulch: If you have new plants, fall is the perfect time to lay down a layer of mulch, which will insulate the roots against cold winter temperatures and protect the ground from eroding away.

Don’t let your property fail in fall! For more great tips, call the experienced team at Executive Landscaping, Inc., today!